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When it comes to kitchen sinks, manufacturing advancements have expanded the installation possibilities. With so many options on the table, it can be a difficult decision. You might find yourself wondering if an eye-catching apron sink is a good fit. Is there something to those time-tested topmounts? Maybe you're asking what a dual-mount sink is, or which mount is easier to install.

If you're researching your options, here are some pros and cons to help you decide which installation method is best for your kitchen and budget.

Topmount Sinks
Topmount kitchen sinks are installed on top of the counter and suspend from their rims. They're also called drop-in or self-rimming sinks.

Topmounts are usually paired with laminate counters because the sink hides the exposed particle board. They are considered to be the simplest (and cheapest) to install when compared to apron and undermount.

Dirt or food debris from the countertop can collect underneath the 'lip' or rim of these sinks. But don't worry too much because routine cleaning helps cut down on grimy buildup.

Undermount Sinks
Undermount kitchen sinks are installed below the countertop. They remain secured in place with a silicon-based adhesive.

If you have granite or marble countertops, undermount sinks showcase the perimeter of the sink opening. They are stylish and aesthetically pleasing. Better yet, they're hygienic options because they're rimless. You can easily sweep remnant water or food debris directly into the sink.

Before installation, the opening in the countertop must be cut properly or major complications will arise. And since the counters are usually made of expensive materials, this could be a costly obstacle. We recommend using caution and contacting a professional to make sure the installation goes smoothly.

Dual-mount Sinks
Like the name suggests, dual-mount sinks can be installed in two ways, based on your preference: topmounts or undermounts.

Renovations and home projects rarely offer flexibility, but the dual-mount option surely does. The super flat rim of a dual-mount sink means it attaches easily to the bottom of solid-surface countertops. Or, if you decide to go with tile or laminate counters, it can be dropped in as a topmount sink.

Whether you choose to install a dual-mount as a drop-in or an undermount sink will determine the kinds of "cons" you can expect.

Apron Sinks
Apron, or farmhouse, kitchen sinks are a stylish, and increasingly popular, choice for many modern homes. They are installed so that the front-facing surface of the sink is completely exposed.

Apron sinks are "user-friendly" because they extend a couple of inches past the edge of the counter. You can stand directly against them and reduce back strain when you're washing or lifting dishes. The deep basins accommodate large pots and pans. And most often, they are installed so they sit beneath the countertop. Like undermounts, you can easily wipe water or scraps directly into the sink during cleanup.

Apron sinks are extremely heavy, and your cabinets will need customized adjustments. We recommend contacting a cabinet fabricator to help you plan your installation.

No matter which installation method you choose, a new kitchen sink is an exciting investment! To learn more about the installation methods of our MR Direct sinks, visit: https://www.mrdirectint.com/support/index.html#home-all-product-types and click on a material type.